Guidelines for magazine submissions

Magazine Submissions

Magazine submissions are invited for the next issue of the Ethical Rebel. We are particularly excited about this issue as it will be a Cornwall College Student Take Over. The students are providing all the imagery and we are inviting writers everywhere to submit articles, opinion pieces and other written content. We are always interested in hearing what you think about ethical fashion and issues in the fashion industry.

Cover of Ethical Rebel magazine

Student Take Over

We’re very excited about the Student Take Over of the next issue of the Ethical Rebel Magazine.

The theme is Superheroes = those who do what’s right in the face of adversity.

Our topics are: pollution, especially plastics; the role of vintage, charity shop and secondhand clothing; and modern day slavery in the fashion industry.

Brands tackling these ethical fashion issues will feature in a double page spread.

Students will provide all the imagery – illustrations, photography and videos – as well as setting up the layout and creating a few garments of their own.

Written work can be submitted by anyone.

Job Roles for Student Submissions

Student Submissions

These submission guidelines provide a starting point for your research and inspiration.
All imagery will be provided by Cornwall College students, so your creativity will be stamped all over it.
Written work can be submitted by anyone.
Cornwall College students are invited to submit the following types of work inspired by or referencing our theme and topics:
photography and videos; articles; illustrations; infographics; logo ideas for the Ethical Rebel; and garments.
Final deadline 28 February 2019

Ethical rebels pose in Charlie's Angel style

The need for Ethical Rebels

The industrial revolution in Victorian England has been well documented by authors such as Charles Dickens and is generally associated with an era of abject poverty, abusive employers, high levels of pollution, dangerous factories with frequent accidents that maim or kill employees, workers forced to live in slums and a lucky man is one who makes it to the age of 30.

We now relegate these images to history; a time long ago that is no longer relevant to a modern and sophisticated society that takes an arsenal of health & safety and employment laws for granted.

But over the last few decades our factories have moved overseas as retailers drive down production costs to make bigger profits. These overseas factories emulate the same appalling Victorian conditions: workers in buildings that should be condemned, structurally unsound and with no fire exits; wages so low that even working over 100 hours a week cannot earn enough to feed a family; drinking water contaminated by chemicals and dyes; and that’s just the stuff we know.

And the price of our clothes has dropped. Dramatically. A generation of young people has now grown up with and expects clothes to be cheap. But these cheap clothes, that cost us so little, is costing the people that make them their very lives.

But the problem does not end there. Because these clothes are so cheap, they are quickly replaced, even when there is nothing wrong with them and often when they haven’t even been worn. The volume of clothing that goes to landfill has been recorded as the second biggest pollutant in the world after oil. It’s actually worse than the plastic contamination in our seas.

A fair price means paying garment workers at a rate they can live on and providing safe working conditions. This means higher production costs, which would mean increasing the price of our clothes. In many cases, the price would only need to increase by a couple of pounds, but it would ensure that the people making our clothes can afford to eat and not live in squalor. It would also add value to our clothes. If you have to spend more, you’re going to make sure you invest your money wisely and keep your clothes lasting longer.

High street retailers just don’t believe that the British public is conscientious enough to pay a fair price for their clothes anymore.

I believe differently. I believe that most people do care. The issue is that they aren’t being given a choice.

Magazine feature on the need for Ethical Fashion

The need for Ethical Fashion

Consider everything you know about the industrial revolution in Victorian England: dangerous factories, workers forced to live in slums, abject poverty, abnormally low mortality rates, high levels of pollution. Those same conditions are now being experienced by an increasing number of countries throughout the world as retailers switch from buying products at fair prices to demanding cheaper products so they can make bigger profits or under-price to attract more customers. With each lower price poverty levels and the working conditions of the people who make our clothes deteriorate yet further.